Imbaba

Photos for Anthony Shadid's story in the NYTimes describing the state of Cairo after the revolution by focusing on Imbaba.

Imbaba, one of the poorer neighborhoods in Cairo is connected with Zamalek, one of the richer neighborhoods in Cairo by a 10 cent ferry. Imbaba is a large neighborhood running along the western shore of the nile and stretches inland including an abandoned airport and farmland.

Now that the Muslim Brotherhood can work openly they have opened a well-signed new satellite office in Imbaba. Underneath the Muslim Brotherhood's residents wait for a late night meeting and talk with the mason of a new tire store.

Inflation of food prices was one of the fuels for the revolution. While prices are still increasing the rate of increase has slowed. Many staples such as bread are highly subsidized by the government.

Milk is delivered house to house on a motorcycle from the agricultural outskirts of Imbaba to the congested central area. Like many residents of Imbaba the milk-man moved to Cairo when he was young in search of a job the neighborhood expanded through his generation little original urban planning or government services and infrastructure was patched together.

Young men hang outside an arcade where 1LE buys a game of soccer on a playstation. Relatively high unemployment and underemployment leaves a lot of free time.

Food price inflation was one of the suspected fuels for the revolution. While prices are still increasing the rate of increase has slowed. Many staples such as bread are highly subsidized by the government.

Knots of young men gather around play stations in a small arcade to play a game of soccer as Ahly vs. Egypt's national team. For the ambitious one of the most common questions is still, how to get to the US, though there are rumored better job prospects by traveling through Turkey to Europe.

A side-street of the wedding is prepared for the bride and a mainly female party. During a wedding a street is taken over and filled with seating, a stage, and a large incense burner at the entrance. Other neighborhoods have moved their weddings to hotels and special venues, but in Imbaba they are a chance for the whole street to gather and celebrate.

A shop in Imbaba is filled with household goods. While many things are imported from China, Egypt has its own strong manufacturing base in the delta.

The newly rebuilt Church of the virgin stands over Al-Wehda Street in Imbaba Cairo. The church was set on fire during a single night of apparent sectarian violence in the streets of Imbaba.

Across the street from the Church of the Virgin Mohamad Ahmed sells roasted corn beside a christian stationary sales-man and a muslim fruit-seller. All of them emphasize that there is unity among religions in Imbaba and that it was "thugs" who incited the violence that led to the Church fire in May.